What if your tenant moves out without paying their utility bills or council tax? Does it fall on you as the landlord to pick up the pieces?

This is a common question among both landlords and tenants, and it needs clearing up. So, who is responsible for unpaid utility bills? Let’s find out.

 

Are Landlords Responsible For Unpaid Utility Bills?

Not usually. As long as it is the tenant’s name on the bill, and it is stated in the tenancy agreement that tenants are responsible for utilities, landlords are not liable for unpaid bills left over by tenants.

However, as a landlord, there are some steps you will need to take to protect yourself if you find yourself in this tricky situation;

  • Always tell the local council when a new tenant moves in. You will need to provide the names of the new tenants and the contact details of the previous tenants so they can get in touch if needs be.
  • Inform the energy suppliers of the property of any change in tenancy (this includes gas, electricity and water)
  • Encourage new tenants to change the name on the utility bills as soon as possible.
  • Make a note of the meter readings at the start and end of each tenancy so you have a record for the utility companies.
  • Ensure your tenancy agreement clearly states that utility payments are the responsibility of the tenant.
  • Keep a signed copy of the tenancy agreement in a safe, easily accessible place.

 

What Bills Are Tenants Responsible For?

This depends on the tenancy agreement you have in place.

Commonly, tenants are responsible for the following bills;

  • Water
  • Electricity
  • Gas
  • Council tax
  • Internet

However, this is not always the case. Let’s look at two different situations;

 

Utilities Registered In The Tenant’s Name

When bills are registered in the tenant’s name, the tenant is responsible for paying them from the date they move into the property. However, they are not responsible for any debts left behind from previous tenants. It’s important for tenants to check the meter readings on move-in day so they can supply their energy providers with the correct readings at the start of their tenancy.

In this case, landlords are not required to pay any remaining payments after their tenant has left. The utility companies will have to chase the tenant themselves, meaning the issue is out of your hands.

 

Utilities Registered In The Landlord’s Name

You can choose to register bills in the landlord’s name and ask the tenant to pay you for their usage. This can be helpful for short lets, or if you rent out a room in your own house. However, if the tenant leaves without paying, you may be responsible for paying the outstanding sum.

To avoid this situation, always follow the steps outlines above.

 

End Of Tenancy Utility Bills

To end a contract, most utility suppliers require a few days notice before the end of a tenancy. As long as the bills are in the tenant’s name, this is entirely their responsibility to organise.

If there is outstanding debt left over and…

  • The utilities are in the landlord’s name
  • Or the tenant failed to register for utilities whilst living at the property

You may be able to prove the tenants were living at the property if you supply a copy of the tenancy agreement. However, this will depend on the individual policies of the utility companies.

 

Who Is Responsible For Bills During Void Periods?

If your property is empty for any period of time, the owner of the property is responsible for utility payments.

This is why it’s best to keep energy usage to a minimum in between tenants. However, during the winter, we recommend keeping the heat consistent to protect against mould and damp and avoid further maintenance costs in the long run.

If your property is left vacant for an extended period, you will need to organise regular vacant property inspections to check for leaks or mould.

 

 

Who Is Responsible For Utilities In Multiple Occupancy Properties?

If there are several tenants living at a property, disputes can often arise regarding bills. The main thing to remember is that whoever’s name is on the bill is ultimately responsible.

This means, if all tenants in a house share or HMO rental property have their name registered to a utility bill, they are all equally liable to repay debts, even if it’s only one tenant who hasn’t paid.

 

Property Management Help From No Letting Go

One of the simplest ways to avoid disputes and protect your investment at the end of a tenancy is to have all of your property reports in one easily accessible place.

All of our check in reports come with utility checks and meter readings included to help landlords and property professionals keep on top of their responsibilities.

Keen to learn more about how our flexible reporting could help? Find our full list of property inventory services here.

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